redefiningfood:

Breakfast oatmeal love: Vegan Apple Pie Oatmeal 

After the success of my Creamy Vegan Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal, I came down one morning and saw apples sitting in the fridge and new instantly what had to be done. Of course, my mental thought process was helped by the fact that my mother was making an actual apple pie. Well, nearly. It was a pear tart, but the cinnamon-vanilla scented inspiration stands. A combination of sweet, soft but slightly crunchy stewed apples, rum-soaked raisins, chewy almond milk oatmeal, crunchy walnuts topped with a sprinkling of cinnamon, it was a divine luxury of a breakfast.
Dice half an apple into 1cm or bite-sized chunks, and put them in a cooking pot with 1/4 cup of apple juice on a medium heat until they become soft. Meanwhile, soak raisins in liquid to make the dried grapes inflate with a little water - I like to use rum, just because it tastes perfect with raisins. 
In a toaster oven or on a pan, toast the walnuts for around 5-10 minutes on a low heat. Then chop them up.
In the cooking pot with the apples, add your almond milk for oatmeal cooking (I use 3/4 cup) and bring to a boil. Then, put in your oatmeal (I use 35g for 3/4 cup of almond milk) and cook with the apples until it reaches your desired consistency. Add the raisins, chopped walnuts and top with cinnamon seasoning.

redefiningfood:

Breakfast oatmeal love: Vegan Apple Pie Oatmeal 

After the success of my Creamy Vegan Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal, I came down one morning and saw apples sitting in the fridge and new instantly what had to be done. Of course, my mental thought process was helped by the fact that my mother was making an actual apple pie. Well, nearly. It was a pear tart, but the cinnamon-vanilla scented inspiration stands. A combination of sweet, soft but slightly crunchy stewed apples, rum-soaked raisins, chewy almond milk oatmeal, crunchy walnuts topped with a sprinkling of cinnamon, it was a divine luxury of a breakfast.

  1. Dice half an apple into 1cm or bite-sized chunks, and put them in a cooking pot with 1/4 cup of apple juice on a medium heat until they become soft. Meanwhile, soak raisins in liquid to make the dried grapes inflate with a little water - I like to use rum, just because it tastes perfect with raisins. 
  2. In a toaster oven or on a pan, toast the walnuts for around 5-10 minutes on a low heat. Then chop them up.
  3. In the cooking pot with the apples, add your almond milk for oatmeal cooking (I use 3/4 cup) and bring to a boil. Then, put in your oatmeal (I use 35g for 3/4 cup of almond milk) and cook with the apples until it reaches your desired consistency. Add the raisins, chopped walnuts and top with cinnamon seasoning.
redefiningfood:


The colors of summer falling into fall: Vegan Caprese Interpretations with Tomato, Avocado and Butternut Squash

At what point does a name and the essence of what it is designating separate? As I ate this salad - can it be called a salad? What definintively constitutes a salad? - the combination of the balsamic glaze, the tomato and the basil gave me the food experience connoted with the word “Caprese”, yet without the mozarella, I didn’t know if I could call it such a name. Reading about a professor teaching about The Platonic Dialogues through a Sandwich I felt the common experience of experiencing common sense without truly pinpointing at what point my experience was common. We know what a salad, or a caprese is not, but when asked to define exactly what it is, interpretations vary. And this is perhaps the reflection of my dancing shadow of a Caprese salad on the dark wall of Plato’s cave. 
For the recipe, click the Read More


Read More

redefiningfood:

The colors of summer falling into fall: Vegan Caprese Interpretations with Tomato, Avocado and Butternut Squash

At what point does a name and the essence of what it is designating separate? As I ate this salad - can it be called a salad? What definintively constitutes a salad? - the combination of the balsamic glaze, the tomato and the basil gave me the food experience connoted with the word “Caprese”, yet without the mozarella, I didn’t know if I could call it such a name. Reading about a professor teaching about The Platonic Dialogues through a Sandwich I felt the common experience of experiencing common sense without truly pinpointing at what point my experience was common. We know what a salad, or a caprese is not, but when asked to define exactly what it is, interpretations vary. And this is perhaps the reflection of my dancing shadow of a Caprese salad on the dark wall of Plato’s cave. 

For the recipe, click the Read More

Read More

redefiningfood:

A leftovers kind of lunch: Egg White Spinach Omelet with Microgreens and White Asparagus

What do you have after a cake making session? The obvious answer is a chocolate cake. The corollary answer is a successful birthday party. Perhaps the less obvious answer, only hinted through the sheer extent of this macaron making session, is a lot of egg whites. Which of course answers the question “What am I going to eat for my next meal?” Because the answer can only be, a delicious, vegetable-filled egg white omelet that is perhaps more spinach than egg, filled with carmelized onion, toasted pine nuts and fresh microgreens. 
Add 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil to a pan, with 1/2 diced onion. Cook on a medium to low heat for around 8-10 minutes until the onions become translucent or even a golden brown. 
Meanwhile, blanch a handful of Spinach in water with a teaspoon of salt until a bright green color, and then roll it up and dice the spinach and squeeze out all the liquid. Put it in the pan and stir until the spinach is a little wilted. Add toasted pine nuts.
Then, add 3-4 egg whites (I used 1/2 a cup of egg whites) whisked with a tablespoon of almond milk and lots of salt and pepper to the pan on a low heat, and let it sit for a little while until the bottom is cooked through and the top just about cooks. Once the omelet is cooked through, scrape the bottom until it comes off and fold it in half over some freshly cut microgreens. 

redefiningfood:

A leftovers kind of lunch: Egg White Spinach Omelet with Microgreens and White Asparagus

What do you have after a cake making session? The obvious answer is a chocolate cake. The corollary answer is a successful birthday party. Perhaps the less obvious answer, only hinted through the sheer extent of this macaron making session, is a lot of egg whites. Which of course answers the question “What am I going to eat for my next meal?” Because the answer can only be, a delicious, vegetable-filled egg white omelet that is perhaps more spinach than egg, filled with carmelized onion, toasted pine nuts and fresh microgreens. 

  1. Add 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil to a pan, with 1/2 diced onion. Cook on a medium to low heat for around 8-10 minutes until the onions become translucent or even a golden brown. 
  2. Meanwhile, blanch a handful of Spinach in water with a teaspoon of salt until a bright green color, and then roll it up and dice the spinach and squeeze out all the liquid. Put it in the pan and stir until the spinach is a little wilted. Add toasted pine nuts.
  3. Then, add 3-4 egg whites (I used 1/2 a cup of egg whites) whisked with a tablespoon of almond milk and lots of salt and pepper to the pan on a low heat, and let it sit for a little while until the bottom is cooked through and the top just about cooks. Once the omelet is cooked through, scrape the bottom until it comes off and fold it in half over some freshly cut microgreens. 

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

imgonnamakeachange:

Seriously look how small my stomach has gotten tho. This is the smallest it’s ever been. And yes, this is the same person, before anybody bitches. I got a lot of new tattoos and died my hair blonde. 5’1”, ~200 lbs to ~120 lbs. Clean eating and working out is all it takes.

(via hdasian)

mightyhealthyquest:

In my opinion the only person you should get healthy for is yourself :)

(via wigwams)

saladforpresident:

Jon’s Green Salad with Tomatoes and Garlic-Sea Salt Mustard Vinaigrette
Serves 3 
Difficutly Level: Easy

I am thrilled to post my first Artist-Made salad from the MoMA PS1 Salad Garden that I have been toiling away at for the last two months. 

My first piece of advice: do not look at a day in the life of Jon Kessler if you want to feel productive or accomplished yourself. No matter who you are.

Jon is a famously beloved professor at Columbia University Visual Arts program, he has exhibited his kinetic sculptures and massive installations worldwide since the mid 1980s, he is a father, the husband to the brilliant author Asti Hustvedt, and a member of two bands. He himself is always a student, taking risks with his work and dedicating much of his time to inspiring others to never get too comfortable. Jon is someone I turn to when I am looking for some truth (I am not sure he knows how to deliver much else), and I was honored to spend a few hours of his precious time making a salad, talking about the life of an artist, learning to paint, and the prospect of old age with an ocean view.

Jon Kessler on Eli Zabar, Cooking and Music as a Litmus Test

Jon: This salad is really simple, and best made with freshly picked tomatoes. I know the tomatoes in the garden aren’t ready yet, so I brought some from the store. The greens are perfect though. This recipe is courtesy of Eli Zabar.

Julia: Is there a Zabar’s cookbook?

Jon: No, he’s a friend. He taught this to me himself.

Julia: Really?! That is a great New York celebrity to have has a friend.

J: Last summer, Asti [Jon’s wife, author, and upcoming guest salad chef] and I had a residency at the Dora Maar house. The house is located in a small town in the South of France called Minèrbes, and Eli and his wife, Devon Fredericks, own a house in the same town. Going to the market with Eli in the South of France is a fucking trip. He goes there to source products for his New York stores: The Vinegar Factory, EAT and Eli’s. Going to these markets could potentially be really overwhelming, but he knows all the best vendors — where to get the best apricots, the best cherry preserves…

Julia: Do you cook often?

JK: I like to cook, but Asti does most of the cooking and I do more of the grilling. I am a good cook, but we don’t work the same way in the kitchen. As a rule, I do not use cookbooks, and Asti is so diligent with a recipe, her cookbooks are filled with corrections and modifications to the measurements, notes in the margins…

J: I wish sometimes that I were that way, but I am not.

JK: Me neither. I can’t help it; I need to create without rules. There are certain things I have never been good at, even as a child (I am pretty sure I had ADHD): I hated board games, puzzles, all the things that the other kids would do. Instead, I was building tree houses and putting things together; I craved individualized, creative play.

Even now, I am in two bands, one with [artist] John Miller and the other with [artist] Robert Longo. I hate playing cover songs, unless we transform them to the point where it is unrecognizable. I don’t want to play someone else’s music.

J: Have you ever enjoyed playing someone else’s music?

JK: No, I came out of the traditions of improv, jazz and jam bands. I am continually amazed at the impact that my upbringing of smoking dope and playing with jam bands has had on the way I make my art. It is the same reason why I just don’t like to follow recipes in the kitchen. I like to taste, see what something needs, make a decision that might not follow the prescribed rules.

J: When I am not in studio, I am cooking, and finding other more immediate ways to collaborate and share the things I make. Is this how music functions for you?

JK: Music is a big part of the overage, the surplus of my artistic energy. I used to work in a manic way – pull all nighters, do drugs. That changed when I had my daughter. I love coming home at 7pm and having dinner with my family, but that still leaves me hours to fill later in the evening.

These days, I have a habit of drawing in the evening, while Asti reads or after we watch an episode of The Good Wife.

Jon Kessler on Teaching, Painting, and Moving to Trinidad

J: Do you feel like a father figure to your students? Like you gave birth to us all?

JK: When I go to a big art opening and all of my former students are all around, I feel like I am part of a really big family.

If an alum reaches out, I try to be responsive. Being in the art world is really about being part of a network of people, and that network gives you strength.

J: When I think about the lecture you gave my first night as a student at Columbia, the message that sticks with me was, as a good artist, one never “figures it out.” Success is not a cure for self-doubt, but it can drive you to keep going.

JK: I am honest about the ebbs and flows about a career and creative juices. If anything, and I have learned this from my own teachers, you have to be honest with students. But there also comes a point where you have say, “I have to go home now, I have a life.”

J: What do you love about teaching?

JK: I love getting to know people. You don’t get anything out of teaching if you don’t put a lot into it. In the last couple years, I’ve started to paint. This is a direct result of being in graduate students’ studios.

I have been painting everything: still lives, landscapes, figurative work, abstraction. I am spending time in the material.

J: That is amazing, and unexpected; quite a radical departure from kinetic sculptures, and chaotic installations.

JK: It is amazing. I spent my whole residency at the Dora Maar House painting. It was a gorgeous studio with incredible light. Every day, I would just open the windows and attempt to paint the landscape.

J: Does it make you nervous to make such a drastic shift in your studio practice at this point in your career?

JK: Yes and no. I am not prone to that kind of anxiety, I have already walked off the cliff a few times in my career. So yes, I could be nervous, or I could see this as, “Wow, maybe late in life I will be living in Trinidad, doing hot yoga 4 times a week, and painting.”

J: Do you think you could really do that?

JK: Yes, I do. At this point in my life, I am really well-known for making one kind of work, but that is how you know you gotta fuck it up.

J: Would you be lonely? Going from a very social New York, to an island lifestyle?

JK: While Asti and I were in the South of France, we were away from friends and family, and it was great. We met new people, made friends. I think that loneliness will be even less important as I get older.

J: Then what are you waiting for?

JK: Good question… Asti is not ready to move to Trinidad, yet. But, I don’t want to be an old person in New York. I want to build myself a really great place to spend my old age, while my body is still capable. That could be in India, or Africa, somewhere on the beach. So right now, that’s my goal.

I can imagine, 20 years down the road, when I am no longer compelled by the physicality of my large installations, I will want to commune with a painting that is right there in front of me.

J: Jon! That is really romantic! You sound so at peace with that, I am jealous.

JK: Yeah it is really fun.

J: Have you shown anyone your paintings?

JK: I have only shown the paintings to my students, again, to show them the value of being an amateur, and the value of putting your ass on the line.

J: That is what makes a good artist. Taking risks. Now show me your paintings.

JK: (Smiles)

——————————————————————-

RECIPE

Ingredients

- 2-3 cloves of fresh garlic, peeled

- 1 tsp rock salt

- 1 tbs Dijon mustard

- 1 tbs Sherry vinegar

- 3 tbs high quality extra virgin olive oil

- 1 cup cherry tomatoes (or diced larger tomatoes if you prefer)

- 1 lb salad greens, we used arugula, mustard greens, mache and Merlot Lettuce from the garden

Instructions

Using a mortar and pestle, make a mash with the garlic and rock salt, the more coarse the salt, the better. Add to a large mixing bowl.

Add mustard and vinegar to garlic mash. Whisk in olive oil until emulsified.

Wash and spin salad greens. Place in salad bowl on top of dressing and gently toss, making sure to cover all the leaves evenly. Season with cracked pepper and serve.

(via beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)

redefiningfood:

Redefiningfood gives food tips: The Best Way to Dice Avocado

A way to go from creamy, perfect avocado flesh encased in skin to creamy, perfect avocado flesh ready to eat or cook with in less than one minute flat. Using a knife, create vertical lines down the halved and pitted avocado, and then create horizontal lines (like drawing squares. Then, squeeze the avocado, and there you have it! Another tip: Add lemon juice to stop avocado flesh from browning.

(via beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)

This is my health blog promoting a healthy living. My main blog is called queen0fengland.tumblr.com

You may ask me things there since this is a side blog

view archive



Go ahead ask!

Submit